Dr. Sterniczuk’s scope of practice is limited to adults and older adults.  Asessment is provided for the following:

• Acquired Brain Injury

• Concussion

• Mild Cognitive Impairment

• Neurodegenerative Conditions

A Baseline Cognitive Assessment is an overview of your thinking abilities across various domains, including intelligence, problem solving ability, language, attention, learning, and memory.  A Comprehensive Neuropsychological Evaluation is an in-depth, customized examination of brain function (i.e., behavior, cognition, and emotion), in relation to brain injury or neurological illness.  Among other things, a Comprehensive Neuropsychological Evaluation can provide detailed information regarding your strengths and weaknesses, as well as assist with diagnostic issues and treatment planning. v Each of these services is explained in greater detail in the other sections on this page.

Dr. Sterniczuk is not accepting referrals pertaining to personal injury litigation or medico-legal claims, at this time.

Baseline Cognitive Assessment

What is a Baseline Cognitive Assessment?

A Baseline Cognitive Assessment is an overview of your thinking abilities across various domains, including intelligence, problem solving ability, language, attention, learning, and memory.

What is the purpose of a Baseline Cognitive Assessment?

A Baseline Cognitive Assessment can help you better understand how your current thinking abilities compare to other people your same age.  Results of a Baseline Cognitive Assessment can serve as a proactive way to monitor changes to brain health over time, and identify areas for further evaluation.

What should I expect?

A Baseline Cognitive Assessment consists of an hour long interview about your background, medical history, and current difficulties, followed by the administration of tests. Because a Baseline Cognitive Assessment is an overview of brain function, testing typically takes a few hours.  You may become tired or need a break during testing.  You are welcome to take breaks during your assessment, as needed.

What should I bring?

You are welcome to bring a snack and/or beverage to stay hydrated. If you wear hearing aids or eyeglasses, bring them with you. Take your medications as you normally do (unless your doctor tells you otherwise).  It is also helpful to bring a list of your current medications.

How should I prepare for my assessment?

There is no studying or preparation required for a Baseline Cognitive Assessment.  Your performance is not evaluated the same way it was during your schooling years (e.g., pass vs. fail).  You are not expected to get every answer or problem correct.  You are simply asked to try your best so that the results are an accurate reflection of your current capabilities.

Who will get the results of my assessment?

The results of your evaluation are written in a confidential report.  A copy of the report will be sent to the provider who made the referral, or to you, if you were self-referred.  Your consent is required to submit the report to anyone else.

How will I obtain the results?

Feedback is dependent upon the referral source.  If you are self-referred or referred by your doctor, results of your assessment may be provided during a separate session following the completion of your assessment.  It is also recommended that you review and discuss the findings with your doctor.  If you have been referred by a third-party, feedback may be dependent upon permission restrictions, and will be discussed on a case-by-case basis.

Comprehensive Neuropsychological Evaluation

How is a Comprehensive Neuropsychological Evaluation different from a Baseline Cognitive Assessment?

While a Baseline Cognitive Assessment provides an overview of your abilities across several areas of thinking (e.g., intelligence, language, attention, memory), a Comprehensive Neuropsychological Evaluation is an in-depth, customized examination of brain function (i.e., behavior, cognition, and emotion), in relation to brain injury or neurological illness.  Among other things, a Comprehensive Neuropsychological Evaluation can provide detailed information regarding your strengths and weaknesses, as well as assist with diagnostic issues and treatment planning.

What should I expect?

A Comprehensive Neuropsychological Evaluation consists of a 1-2 hour long interview about your background, medical history, and current difficulties.  The interview may also involve another person who knows you well, such as a family member, close friend, or caregiver.  Standardized testing takes several hours (~5-8), and may require more than one day.  You may become tired or need a break during testing.  You are welcome to take breaks during your evaluation, as needed.

What should I bring?

Given the length of the assessment, you are encouraged to bring a snack and/or lunch, as well as a beverage to stay hydrated.  If you wear hearing aids or eyeglasses, bring them with you.  Take your medications as you normally do (unless your doctor tells you otherwise).  It is also helpful to bring a list of your current medications.

What does the estimated cost include?

The cost of a Comprehensive Neuropsychological Evaluation is determined on a case-by-case basis.  Fees are calculated based on the time required for: file review or review of medical records; the initial interview; test administration; scoring of test material; interpretation of the gathered information; and report writing, including recommendations for further evaluation and/or treatment.  A typical assessment can involve 14 or more hours of billing time, plus the cost of materials.

How should I prepare for my evaluation?

There is no studying or preparation required for a Neuropsychological Evaluation.  Your performance is not evaluated the same way it was during your schooling years (e.g., pass vs. fail).  You are not expected to get every answer or problem correct.  You are simply asked to try your best so that the results are an accurate reflection of your current capabilities.

Who will get the results of my evaluation?

The results of your evaluation are written in a confidential report.  A copy of the report will be sent to the provider who made the referral, or to you, if you were self-referred.  Your consent is required to submit the report to anyone else.

How will I obtain the results?

Feedback is dependent upon the referral source.  If you are self-referred or referred by your doctor, results of your Neuropsychological Evaluation may be provided during a separate session following the completion of your assessment.  It is also recommended that you review and discuss the findings with your doctor.  If you have been referred by a third-party, feedback may be dependent upon permission restrictions, and will be discussed on a case-by-case basis.

Price List for Neuropsychological Services for Adults

*All Services GST Exempt
Service Number of Sessions Price*
Baseline Cognitive Assessment 1 hour interview and ~3 hours of testing $1,600 flat rate
Comprehensive Neuropsychological Evaluation ~6 to 8 hours of testing, over 1 or 2 days $225 per session (50 minutes)

Direct Billing and Insurance

For your convenience, we can direct bill neuropsychological assessments directly to your insurance company.  Direct billing is currently available for the following insurance companies: Alberta Blue Cross, Chambers of Commerce, Cowan, Desjardins, First Canadian, Great West Life, Industrial Alliance, Johnson Inc., Johnston Group, Manulife, Maximum Benefit, Sun Life and The Cooperators.

Please note that you may be able to submit your psychological assessment directly to insurance companies not listed above or if you have a health spending plan you may be able to utilize it.


Disclaimer – Services provided by psychologists in the private sector are not covered by the standard Alberta Health Care Insurance Plan.  However, for many, psychological services are included in extended health care insurance packages. To avoid any surprises, it is recommended that you consult with your private health care provider to determine these terms and conditions prior to your first appointment.


List of Publications by Roxana Sterniczuk, PhD

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

Sterniczuk, R., & Whelan, J. (2016). Cannabis use in Canadian Armed Forces veterans. Journal of Military, Veteran and Family Health, 2, 42-52.

Chan, R., Sterniczuk, R., Enkhbold, Y., Jeffers, R.T., Basu, P., Chow, S-L., Smith, V.M., Duong, B., & Antle, M.C. (2016). Phase shifts to light are altered by antagonists to neuropeptide receptors. Neuroscience, 327, 115-124.

Sterniczuk, R., Theou, O., Rusak, B., & Rockwood, K. (2015). Cognition test performance in relation to health and function in 12 European countries: The SHARE study. Canadian Geriatrics Journal, 18, 144-151.

Sterniczuk, R., Rusak, B., & Rockwood, K. (2014). Sleep disturbance in older ICU patients. Clinical Interventions in Aging, 9, 969-977.

Sterniczuk, R., Yamakawa, G.R., Pomeroy, T., & Antle, M.C. (2014). Phase delays to light and gastrinreleasing peptide require the protein kinase A pathway. Neuroscience Letters, 559, 24-29.

Sterniczuk, R., Theou, O., Rusak, B., & Rockwood, K. (2013). Sleep disturbance is associated with incident dementia and mortality. Current Alzheimer Research, 10, 767-775.

Sterniczuk, R., Antle, M.C., Laferla, F.M., & Dyck, R.H. (2010). Characterization of the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease: part 2. Behavioral and cognitive changes. Brain Research, 1348, 149-155.

 Sterniczuk, R., Dyck, R.H., Laferla, F.M., & Antle, M.C. (2010). Characterization of the 3xTg-AD mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease: part 1. Circadian changes. Brain Research, 1348, 139-148.

Sterniczuk R, Colijn, M.A., Nunez, M., & Antle, M.C. (2010). Investigating the role of substance P inphotic responses of the circadian system: individual and combined actions with gastrin-releasing peptide. Neuropharmacology, 58, 277-285.

Antle, M.C., Smith, V.M., Sterniczuk, R., Yamakawa, G.R., & Rakai, B.D. (2009). Physiological responses of the circadian clock to acute light exposure at night. Reviews in Endocrine & Metabolic Disorders, 10, 279-291.

Antle, M.C., Tse, F., Koke, S.J., Sterniczuk, R., & Hagel, K. (2008). Non-photic phase shifting of the circadian clock: role of the extracellular signal-responsive kinases I/II/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway. European Journal of Neuroscience, 28, 2511-2518.

Smith, V.M., Sterniczuk, R., Phillips, C.I., & Antle, M.C. (2008). Altered photic and non-photic phase shifts in 5-HT1A receptor knockout mice. Neuroscience, 157, 513-23.

Sterniczuk, R., Stepkowski, A., Jones, M., & Antle, M.C. (2008). Enhancement of photic shifts with the 5-HT1A mixed agonist/antagonist NAN-190: intra-suprachiasmatic nucleus pathway. Neuroscience,153, 571-580.

Antle, M.C., Sterniczuk, R., Smith, V.M., & Hagel, K. (2007). Non-photic modulation of phase shifts to long light pulses. Journal of Biological Rhythms, 22, 524-533.

Oinonen, K.A., & Sterniczuk, R. (2007). An inverse relationship between typical alcohol consumption and facial symmetry detection ability in young women. Journal of Psychopharmacology, 21, 507-518.

  

Book Chapters

Sterniczuk, R., & Rusak, B. (2016). Sleep in relation to aging, frailty, and cognition. In Fillit, H, Rockwood K, & Young, J. (Ed.), Brocklehurst’s Textbook of Geriatric Medicine and Gerontology pp. 108-1-108-6.e2). 8e Elsevier, Philadelphia.

Sterniczuk, R., & Antle, M. (2015). Chapter 19: Alzheimer’s disease and the mistiming of behavior. In C. Colwell (Ed.), Circadian Medicine. (pp. 283-293). Wiley-Blackwell.

Sterniczuk, R., Darvesh, S., & Rockwood K. (2014). The ageing brain. In Abdulla, A, Gurcharan, R. (Eds.), The Biology of Ageing and its Clinical Application: a practical handbook, 1e (pp. 198-222). Published, Radcliffe, London, UK.